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EDITOR’S COMMENT: this research threatens to undermine the Prime Minister’s plan to achieve net zero emissions by banning sales of new petrol and diesel cars from 2030

Manufacturing electric vehicles generates 63 per cent more carbon dioxide than making petrol or diesel models, damning research has found.

It means some zero-emission vehicles have to be driven for almost 50,000 miles before they are as ‘green’ as cars powered by fossil fuels.

The revelation threatens to undermine the Prime Minister’s plan to achieve net zero emissions by banning sales of new petrol and diesel cars from 2030.

And they suggest the green transport revolution could dramatically increase emissions as electric vehicle production ramps up ahead of the switch.

The report found the production of an all-electric Polestar 2 – owned by Volvo – generates 24 tons of carbon dioxide, compared with 14 tons for a petrol-engine Volvo XC40. 

The study, commissioned by Honda, Aston Martin, Bosch and McLaren, says: ‘You would have to drive 48,700 miles in a Polestar 2 before its carbon footprint becomes smaller than a Volvo XC40. Similar results have been shown by studies conducted by Volkswagen comparing the e-Golf against the diesel Golf.’

The study’s authors say the results prove electric vehicles are ‘no silver bullet’ in helping the UK achieve net zero emissions by 2050. They suggest ministers should instead focus on reducing emissions in the vehicle production process. 

Read the full article here.

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